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Archive for February, 2017|Monthly archive page

The Girl Who Drank the Moon

In Uncategorized on February 25, 2017 at 2:57 pm

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by Kelly Barnhill

Fantasy/©2016/Recommended for Middle School

Book Info (Courtesy of Goodreads)

Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster named Glerk and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, Fyrian. Xan rescues the abandoned children and deliver them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey.

One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. Xan decides she must raise this enmagicked girl, whom she calls Luna, as her own. To keep young Luna safe from her own unwieldy power, Xan locks her magic deep inside her. When Luna approaches her thirteenth birthday, her magic begins to emerge on schedule–but Xan is far away. Meanwhile, a young man from the Protectorate is determined to free his people by killing the witch. Soon, it is up to Luna to protect those who have protected her–even if it means the end of the loving, safe world she’s always known.

The acclaimed author of The Witch’s Boy has created another epic coming-of-age fairy tale destined to become a modern classic.

What I Thought:

I had heard a lot of good things about this book, but I kept telling myself that I am just not a fan of witch stories and I probably wouldn’t like it. Then it won the Newbery Award. Not that I always loved their choices, but, still, a reason to give it a go. Must admit, I thoroughly enjoyed it, witch and all. The writing was stunning, the characters were unique and memorable, and the plot was creative and engaging. It is a great addition to the middle school library and will appeal to readers who enjoy fantasy.

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The Playbook: 52 Rules to Aim, Shoot, and Score in This Game Called Life

In Middle Grade Book Review, Non-Fiction Reads on February 22, 2017 at 11:41 pm

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by Kwame Alexander

Non-Fiction/©2017/Recommended for Middle School

Book Info (Courtesy of Goodreads)

You gotta know the rules to play the game. Ball is life. Take it to the hoop. Soar. What can we imagine for our lives? What if we were the star players, moving and grooving through the game of life? What if we had our own rules of the game to help us get what we want, what we aspire to, what will enrich our lives?

Illustrated with photographs by Thai Neave, The Playbook is intended to provide inspiration on the court of life. Each rule contains wisdom from inspiring athletes and role models such as Nelson Mandela, Serena Williams, LeBron James, Carli Lloyd, Steph Curry and Michelle Obama. Kwame Alexander also provides his own poetic and uplifting words, as he shares stories of overcoming obstacles and winning games in this motivational and inspirational book just right for graduates of any age and anyone needing a little encouragement.

What I Thought:

I enjoyed Crossover and Booked by this author, so I couldn’t wait to read his latest one. It did not disappoint. This is an absolutely visually stunning book with its mixture of pictures and graphics, so it just grabs your full attention from the very beginning. It is not a story told in verse like his other books, but a piece of nonfiction full of short stories and quotes that are truly inspirational and thought provoking. I especially enjoyed reading the short pieces he wrote about himself, as well as the one about LaBron James that gave me a whole new insight into an athlete for whom I had had a very negative opinion. Scattered among these short pieces was a wide selection of great quotes from the likes of Steph Curry, Michael Jorden, and Sonia Sotomayo. It is a quick read, but it packs a punch. I honestly think it could be life changing for many. Great addition for the middle school library, but a worthy read regardless of age.